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What Causes Mortons Neuroma
05.06.2017 07:51
Overview

Morton neuromaThe nerves located on the bottom of the foot between the metatarsal heads (the bone of the toe closest to the foot) supply feeling, or sensation, to the toes. One of these nerves may become irritated by the ligament located above it, causing it to become thickened and painful. Generally this problem occurs most often between the third and fourth toes, but it can occur between the second and third toes as well. It is uncommon for a neuroma to be located between the first and second or fourth and fifth metatarsals. Rarely is there more than one neuroma in a foot.

Causes

Wearing shoes that are too tight can make the pain of Morton's neuroma worse. This is because the toe bones are more likely to press on the affected nerve if your shoes are too tight. High-heeled shoes, particularly those over 5cm (2 inches), or shoes with a pointed or tight toe area, can also compress your toes and make the pain worse. This is why women tend to be affected by Morton's neuroma more than men.

Foot conditions.

Symptoms

While the condition may at first only appear during heavy repetitive stress or when wearing particular shoes which aggravate the foot, the Neuroma can become increasingly inflamed and produce more constant discomfort, lasting days or weeks. Runners may experience pain pushing off from starting blocks. Tight or narrow shoes as well as high heels likewise aggravate the Neuroma. A checklist of symptoms includes burning pain, occasionally numbness in the ball of the foot. Radiating pain from the ball of the foot to the toes. Intensifying pain during activity and when wearing shoes. Occasional numbness, discomfort, tingling or ?electrical shock sensation? in the toes. Pain between the third and fourth toes, often occurring from the outer side of one toe to the inner side of the adjoining toe. Pain upon leaving the starting blocks in running sports.

Diagnosis

A doctor can usually identify Morton's neuroma during a physical exam. He or she will squeeze or press on the bottom of your foot or squeeze your toes together to see if it hurts. Your doctor may also order an X-ray of your foot to make sure nothing else is causing the pain.

Non Surgical Treatment

Anti-inflammatory drugs may be recommended to dull the pain and lessen swelling. Neuropathic pain medications such as the antionvulsants and / or antidepressants may be tried as well. Many are able to recover from this issue at home by icing the area, resting the feet, and by avoiding wearing narrow or tight shoes. If these remedies do not work to alleviate symptoms, the doctor may give special devices to separate the toes and avoid the squeezing of the nerve. Steroid injections may reduce pain and swelling. Surgery may be required if these do not help.Morton

Surgical Treatment

The ultimate success of a Morton?s neuroma treated surgically can be variable. In cases where the underlying problem is only an irritated nerve (a true Morton?s neuroma), then surgery will probably be curative (although it may take a few months for the foot to fully heal). But in many cases, forefoot pain is more complex. There may be an irritated nerve or two causing pain, but the real problem is often excessive loading of the lesser metatarsals. The generic term for this condition is metatarsalgia. When considering surgery, identifying and addressing these problems may lead to a better end result.

Prevention

Women, particularly those who wear tight shoes, are at greatest risk for Morton?s neuroma. The best way to prevent the condition is to wear shoes with wide toe boxes. Tight, pointed shoes squeeze bones, ligaments, muscles and nerves. High heels may worsen the problem by shifting your weight forward. Over time, this combination can cause the nerves to swell and become painful.

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